Conagher

Civil Parish of Dunmore

Pauline Connolly

Conagher Townland Stone
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Conagher

Conachar, a rabbit warren

Conagher is situated in the civil parish of Dunmore, barony of Dunmore, County Galway. It is located in the north end of the parish, bounded on the north & south by the parish of Addergoole, on the west by the townland of Stripe, and on the east by the townlands of Cloonfane and Curraghaun.

The down survey map 1641 (pre Cromwell) shows that the land was owned by James McCostye, a catholic. In 1670 (post Cromwell), ownership changed to a protestant man called George Stanton. 55 acres of unprofitable and 81 acres of both profitable and forfeited were specified.

O’Donovan’s Field Name Books provides various spellings of this townland: Conachar, Cunnagher, Connagher, Conoher, Conougher and Conagher. According to this source, Conagher was the property of Major Patt Kirwin (Dublin) who was a member of the Kirwan (Cregg Castle) family. Conagher comprised of 813½ statute measure which included about 250 acres of bog. There is a triangulation station located in the area.

Census 1841 – 1851

Conagher consisted of 813 acres 1 acre 3 perches of land. There was a total population of 200 people, 110 were male and 90 were female who occupied 31 houses. By 1851, the population remained much the same with 201 residents, 100 were male and 101 were female. The poor law valuation rate in 1851 was £300-10-0.

Old Age Pension Census Search Forms 1851

Mary Tully – Application Number C15 1599

Mary Tully applied for the pension on the 8th March 1915. At the time of the application, the address she supplied was Mrs Mary Greaney, Ballymary, Milltown, Tuam, County Galway. According to Mary, her parents were James and Bridget Tully (nee Gannon). Mary was awarded an annual pension of £16-15-0.

Martin Quinn – Application Number C15 7018

Martin Quinn applied for the pension on 1st December 1915. At the time of the application his address was Conaher [sic], Milltown, Tuam, County Galway. According to Martin, his parents were Michael and Mary Quinn (nee Flaherty). Martin was awarded an annual pension of £16-15-0.

Thomas Tully – Application Number C16 5964

Thomas Tully applied for the pension on the 11th October 1916. At the time of the application, the address he supplied was Mr James O’Brien, Glenamaddy, County Galway. According to Thomas, his parents were James and Bridget Tully. Thomas was awarded an 9annual pension of £16-15-0.   

Bridget Corless – Application Number C17 1577

Bridget applied for the pension on 17th February 1917. At the time of the application, her address was: Miss Josephine Gleeson, 34 Haddington Road, Dublin. According to Bridget, her parents were James and Mary Corless (nee Mullin) who were married in 1848. Bidy [sic] who was 2 years old was listed on the form. Bridget was awarded an annual pension of £16-15-0.

Mary Deignan [sic] – Application Number C17 2570

Mary Deignan applied for the pension on 23rd March 1917. At the time of the application, her address was Mrs John Feerick, Carranthomas, Dunmore, County Galway. According to Mary, her parents were James and Honor Deignan (nee Higgins). A list of names are rovided on the form: Mary, Bridget, Margrett [sic], Ellen, Kate, Honour, Patrick, John, Tom and Agnes. Mary was awarded an annual pension of £16-15-0.

Mary Toole – Application Number C17 3496

Mary Toole applied for the pension on 14th May 1917. At the time of the application her address was Mrs Mary Cosgrove, Darrary, Dunmore, County Galway. According to Mary, her parents were James and Honor Toole who were married in 1836. A list of children is provided on the census search form: Michael (13), John (11), Thos (9½), Patt (7 and 3 months old), Jas (5 and 2 months old), Honor (age not provided), Martin (3 and 3 month and Mary (1½). Mary was awarded an annual pension of £16-15-0.

Patt Harte – Application Number C17 5300

Patt Harte applied for the pension on the 17th July 1917. At the time of the application, his address was Conagher, Irishtown, Claremorris, County Mayo. According to Patt, his parents were Thomas and Margaret Harte. Patt was awarded an annual pension of £16-15-0.

Mary Corless – Application Number C21 3445

Mary Corless applied for the pension on 11th May 1921. At the time of the application, her address was Michl Killeen, Annefield, Claremorris, County Mayo. According to Mary, her parents were James and Mary Corless. Mary was awarded an annual pension of £16-15-0.

Honor Toole – Application Number C21 3523

Honor Toole applied for the pension on the 14th May 1921. At the time of the application her address was Mrs Honor Tully, Conagher, Irishtown, County Mayo. According to Honor, her parents were James and Honor Toole who were married in 1836. Honor was awarded an annual pension of £16-15-0.

Griffith’s Valuation 1855

According to Griffith’s Valuation 1855 Richard A Kirwan, Maurice Mc Walter and Martin Toole leased a total area of 813 acres 3 roods 21 perches of tenements to the following people: John Prendergast, James Tully, Owen Tully, James Toole, Thomas Harte, James Duignan, Patrick Toole, John Higgins, Martin Toole, Mary Quinn, John Quinn, Maurice Mc Walter, Martin Glynn, John McHugh, William Lyons, Terence Lyons, William Quinn, Michael Quinn and James Corless.  The overall total annual valuation rate paid was £449-6-0.

John Prendergast paid an annual rent of £3-5-0 for 7 acres 0 roods 11 perches of house, offices and land. James Tully and Owen Tully paid £10 for 25 acres 2 roods 38 perches of house, offices and land. James Toole and Thomas Harte paid £9-11-0 for 22 acres 3 roods 18 perches of house, office and land. James Duignan, Patrick Toole and John Higgins paid £13-10 for 20 acres 1 rood 15 perches of house, office and land. Martin Toole paid £32-15-0 for 44 acres 2 roods 7 perches of house, offices and land. Mary Quinn paid £7-5-0 for 9 acres 1 rood 36 perches of house, office and land. John Quinn paid £88-10-0 for 163 acres 15 perches of herd’s house, offices and land. Maurice Mc Walter paid £101-15-0 for 172 acres 3 roods 16 perches of herd’s house, offices and land. Martin Glynn paid £48-5-0 for 64 acres 1 rood 2 perches of herd’s house, offices, and land. John Mc Hugh, William Lyons and Terence Lyons together paid £54 for 75 acres 1 rood 26 perches of house, office and land. William Quinn paid £30 for 39 acres 3 roods 5 perches of house, offices and land. Michael Quinn paid £21-5-0 for 42 acres 2 roods 21 perches of house, offices, mill, kiln and land. James Corless paid £27-15-0 for 48 acres 1 rood 5 perches of house, offices and land. Richard A Kirwan retained an area of bog which comprised of 68 acres 2 roods 6 perches which he paid £1-10-0 for. The overall total annual valuation rate paid in Conagher was £449.

Census 1901

There were 23 households in Conagher in 1901. There were 132 residents, 68 were male and 64 were female. They were all Roman Catholics. A lot of the women who were married to farmers listed their occupation as a farmer’s wife. The heads of households were: John Rattigan, Martin Toole, John Toole, Patrick Harte, John Tully, John Harte, Michael Tully, John Degnon [sic], Patrick Toole, John Higgins, Patrick Quinn, John O’Toole, Michael Diskin, Patrick Connolly, Thomas McHugh, Thomas Tully, Michael Quinn, James Corlis [sic], Mary McWalters, Michael Quinn, Martin Quinn, John Quinn and Margaret Sweeney. The census forms which were collected on the 10th April 1901 showed that the houses were built as private dwellings. Overall, there were a total of 79 farm buildings in the area.

John Rattigan (54) was married to Sabina (59). They both worked as farmers. They lived with their 3 unmarried children.  Michael (26) and John (24) listed their occupations as farmer’s son .Their sister Catherine was 23 years old. The family were born in County Galway. They could read and write. They also spoke Irish and English.They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 4 rooms. The house had walls made from permanent material and the roof was made of perishable roof. John Rattigan owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, and 1 barn.

Martin Toole (54) worked as a farmer. He was married to Kate (44). They lived with their 8 children. James (17) and Martin (16) listed their occupations as farmer’s sons. Honor (14) listed her occupation as a farmer’s daughter. Patrick (12), Mary Anne (10) and Thomas (7) were scholars. Maggie was 5 years old and Kate was 3 years old. The family were born in County Galway. Although Martin, Kate and their 2 youngest children could not read, the rest of the household were able to read and write. The 8 eldest members of the family spoke Irish and English. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house walls were made of stone, brick or concrete while the house roof was made of perishable material. Martin Toole owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 barn.

John Toole (62) who was married to Sarah (60) worked as a farmer. They lived with their 4 unmarried children. Thomas (30), James (23) and John (21) listed their occupations as farmer’s sons. Bridget (28) recorded her occupation as a farmer’s daughter. John and Sarah could not read. Thomas could not read or write but Bridget, James and John were able to read and write. The family spoke Irish and English. They were born in County Galway. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house walls were made of permanent material. The house roof was made of perishable material. John Toole owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 barn.

Patt Harte (50) worked as a farmer. He was married to Oney [sic] (45). They lived with their 7 single children. Margret [sic] (22) and Mary (15) listed their occupations as farmer’s daughters. John (17) listed his occupation as a farmer’s son. Patrick (13) and William (11) were scholars. Oney (9) and Wennie (6) could not read. The rest of the family were able to read. The family were born in County Galway. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house walls were made of permanent material while the roof was made of perishable material. Patrick Harte owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 barn.

John Tully (55) worked as a farmer. He was married to Honor (46). They lived with their 9 unmarried children. James (23), Patrick (19), Michael (17) and Martin (15) listed their occupations as farmer’s sons. Bridget (21) recorded her occupation as a farmer’s daughter. John (13), Honor (11), Mary (9) and Margaret (6) were scholars. Although John could not read, his wife and children were able to read and write. The family spoke Irish and English. They were born in County Galway. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house walls were made of permanent material and the house roof was made of perishable material. John Tully owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

John Harte (30) worked as a farmer. He was married to Honor (35). They lived with their 4 children. Sarah (12) and Mary (10) were scholars who could read and write. Martin (6) and Julia (1) along with their parents could not read. The family were born in County Galway except for Honor who was born in County Mayo. The 4 eldest members of the family spoke Irish and English. The house walls were made of permanent material while the house roof was made of perishable material. The Harte family lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. John Harte owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Michael Tully (65) worked as a shepherd. He was married to Mary (70) who listed her occupation as a shepherd’s wife. Although they could not read, they spoke Irish and English. Michael and Mary were both born in County Galway. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. The house walls were made from of permanent material and it had a roof made of perishable material. Michael Tully owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 piggery.

John Degnon [sic] (38) worked as a farmer. He was married to Bridget (26) who was born in County Mayo. Bridget could read and write but John could not read. They both spoke Irish and English. They lived with their 1 year old son James. John and James were born in County Galway. The family lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house had walls made from permanent material. The house roof was made of perishable material. John Duignan owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, and 1 barn.

Patrick Toole (30) worked as a farmer. He was married to Mary (20) who was born in County Mayo. They lived with their son John (9 months). Patrick’s mother Bridget Toole (65) also lived with them. Patrick, John and Bridget were born in County Galway. Bridget Toole was Patrick’s mother and she was 65 years of age. She was a widow and she could not read. Bridget, Patrick and Mary spoke both Irish and English. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. The house walls were made of permanent material while the roof was made of perishable material. Patrick Toole owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

John Higgins (30) worked as a farmer. He was married to Ellen (26). They had 2 children: Maggie (2) and Sarah (6 months). Margaret Higgins (70) was John’s mother. She was a widow who did not record an occupation. She could not read while John, Ellen and Maggie were able to read and write. The 3 adults spoke Irish and English. The family were born in County Galway. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house walls were made of stone, brick or concrete. The house roof was made of perishable material. John Higgins owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 barn.

Patrick Quinn (80) who was a widower worked as a farmer. He lived with his unmarried brother William (70). Neither Patrick nor William could read. Patrick spoke Irish and English but there was no language listed for William. They were both born in County Galway. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. The house walls were made of permanent material while the house roof was made of perishable material. Patrick Quinn owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house and 1 barn.

John O’Toole (60) worked as a farmer. He was married to Bridget (56). They lived with their 4 unmarried children. Edward (27) and Patrick (23) listed their occupations as farmer’s sons. Ellen (21) and J Annie [sic] (18) recorded their occupations as farmer’s daughters. The family could all read and write. They also spoke Irish and English. The family were born in County Galway. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house walls were made of permanent material while the house roof was made of perishable material. John O’Toole owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 barn.

Michael Diskin (65) recorded his occupation as a farmer. He was married to Margaret (60). They lived with their 4 unmarried children. John (28) and Martin (20) listed their occupations as farmer’s sons. Mary (23) and Honor (10) documented their occupations as farmer’s daughters. Although the 3 eldest members of the household could not read, the rest of the occupants were able to read and write. The family spoke both Irish and English. They were all born in County Galway. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. The house walls were made of permanent material and the house roof was made of perishable. Michael Diskin owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 barn.

Patrick Connolly (45) worked as a shepherd. He was married to Mary (35) who recorded her occupation as a shepherd’s wife. Mary was born in County Mayo. Michael Connolly (50) and Frank Connolly (40) were Patrick’s 2 unmarried brothers who both worked as general labourers. The 3 brothers were born in County Galway. The occupants lived in a 3rd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. The house walls were made of permanent material while the roof was made of perishable material. Patrick Connolly owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

Thomas McHugh (70) who was a widower worked as a farmer. He lived with his son-in-law Michael Toole (30) who also worked as a farmer. Margaret Toole (20), Honor McHugh (10), John McHugh (9) and Michael McHugh who had no age listed were recorded on the census form. The 4 eldest members of the household were born in County Galway. Margaret, Honor and John could read and write while the rest of the household could not read. Thomas and his son-in-law spoke Irish and English. The occupants lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. The house walls were made of stone, brick or concrete. The house roof was made of perishable material. Thomas McHugh owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 barn.

Thomas Tully (40) worked as a farmer. He was married to Catherine (40). Thomas and Catherine could not read. They lived with their 7 children. Patrick (16) listed his occupation as a farmer’s son. Mary (14), Kate (11) and William (9) were scholars. The 3 youngest children Ellen (6), Julia (3) and Thomas (1) could not read but their 4 older siblings were able to read and write. The 5 eldest members of the household spoke Irish and English. The family were born in County Galway. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house walls were made from permanent material while the house roof was made of perishable material. Thomas Tully owned the land on which his house was situated along with 4 farm buildings.

Michael Quinn (65) worked as a farmer. He was married to Bridget (48). They lived with their unmarried son Michael (26) who listed his occupation as a farmer’s son. Julia McHugh (15) worked as a domestic servant. All occupants were born in County Galway. They could read and write. They also spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house walls were made of permanent material. The house roof was made of perishable material. Michael Quinn owned the land on which his house was situated along with 6 farm buildings.

James Corlis (43) listed his occupation as a farmer. He was married to Margaret (40). They lived with their 6 children. James (13) worked as a labourer. John (8), Mary (10) and Maggie (5) were scholars. Pat (4) and George (1) could not read. James, Margaret and the 4 eldest children were able to read and write. The family were born in County Galway. The 4 eldest members of the household spoke Irish and English. They lived in 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house walls were made from permanent material and it had a roof made of perishable material. James Corless owned the land on which his house was situated along with 4 farm buildings.

Mary McWalters (58) was a widowed farmer. Her 3 children, her niece and a visitor who were all unmarried were recorded on the census form. Augustine (30) and Ignatius (23) listed their occupations as farmers sons. Pansey (25) listed her occupation as a farmer’s daughter. Josephine McWalters (10) was Mary’s niece. Charlotte Mc Glynn (27), a visitor was born in Dublin. All occupants could read and write. The 5 eldest members of the household spoke Irish and English. The McWalters family were born in County Galway. They lived in a 1st class house with 7 front windows and the house had 6 rooms. The house roof and walls were made of permanent material. Mary McWalters owned the land on which her house was situated along with 6 farm buildings.

Michael Quinn (55) worked as a farmer. He was married to Jane (36). Richard Prendergast (60) and Maggie Kinnane (16) were recorded on the census forms. Richard and Maggie worked as farm servants. All occupants were born in County Galway. Michael, Jane and Maggie could read and write. Richard was an unmarried man who could not able read and write. The occupants spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 1st class house with 7 front windows and the house had 6 rooms. The house walls and roof were made of permanent material. Michael Quinn owned the land on which his house was situated along with 8 farm buildings.

Martin Quinn (45) worked as a farmer. He was married to Mary (42). They lived with their 3 young children: Michael (5), Mary (4) and Frances (1). John Daly (27) worked as a domestic servant. The 5 eldest members of the household spoke Irish and English. The 3 children could not read or write but all the adults were able to read and write. The occupants were born in County Galway. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house walls were made of permanent material and the house roof was made of perishable material. Martin Quinn owned the land on which his house was situated along with 5 farm buildings.

John Quinn (40) worked as a farmer. He was married to Mary (30). John and Mary spoke Irish and English. They lived with their 4 children: John (6), Michael (4), Patrick (2) and Mary (7 months). John was listed as a scholar who could read. His parents could read and write. Naturally his younger siblings could not read. The family were born in County Galway. The house walls were made of permanent material and the house roof was made of perishable material. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 4 farm buildings. John Quinn owned the land on which his house was situated along with 4 farm buildings.

Margaret Sweeney (30) was a married woman but there was no mention of her husband on the census form. She lived with her 2 young children Mary (4) and Patrick (2). Her father James Conroy (63) was recorded on the census form. Margaret and James spoke Irish and English. There was no occupation documented for any member of the household. No members of the family could read. They were all born in County Galway. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 1 room. The house walls were made of permanent material while the house roof was made of perishable material. Margaret Sweeney owned the land on which her house was situated along but did not own any farm buildings.

Census 1911

There were 22 households in Conagher in 1911. There was also 1 house which was uninhabited (Michael J Quinn owned the land on which this house was situated. There 126 residents, 126 were male and 54 were female. They were all Roman Catholics. Most of the residents were born in County Galway. 7 people were born in County Mayo: Honor Harte (62), Honor Harte (61), Bridget Duignan (44), Mary O’Toole (30), Martin Sweeney (37), Mary Connolly (63), Margaret Corless (52) and Annie Grorke [sic] (20). Overall, there were a total of 110 farm buildings (15 stables, 21 cow houses, 2 calf houses, 22 piggeries, 22 fowl houses, 1 boiling house, 16 barns, 10 cart houses and 1 corn mill). The census forms which were collected between the 10th April 1911 and the 13th April 1911 showed that all houses were listed as private. The heads of the households were: Martin O’Toole, John (James) O’Toole, John Harte, John Tully, Michael Tully, Patrick Harte, John Duignan, Bridget O’Toole, John Higgins, James Conroy, Michael Rattigan, Patrick Quinn, John O’Toole, Margaret Diskin, Patrick Connolly, Thomas Tully, James Corless, Michael Quinn, Mary Mc Walter, Martin Quinn, Michael J Quinn, and John Quinn.

Martin O’Toole (68) worked as a farmer. He was married to Catherine (56). At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 34 years, had 11 children, 10 of whom were still alive in 1911. They lived with their 4 children. Thomas (19) listed his occupation as a farmer’s son. Margaret (16) had no occupation recorded. Catherine (14) and Michael (9) were scholars. Although Martin and Catherine could not read, their children were able to read and write. Martin and Catherine spoke Irish and English but there was no language listed for their children. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house walls were made of permanent material while the house roof was made of perishable material. Martin O’Toole owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn and 1 cart house.

John (James) O’Toole (76) lived with his wife Sarah (75). At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 46 years and they had 7 children, 7 of whom were still alive in 1911. They lived with their 2 unmarried sons Thomas (40) and John (32). John and his 2 sons worked as agricultural labourers. Although John and Sarah could not read, Thomas and John were able to read and write. The family spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. The house walls were made of permanent material and the house roof was made of perishable material. Martin O’Toole owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 fowl house.

John Harte (76) who was a widower worked as a farmer. He lived with his son, daughter-in-law and 3 grandchildren. His son John (49) listed his occupation as a farmer’s son. At the time of the 1911 census, John was married to Honor (62) for 23 years and they had 4 children, 4 of whom were still alive in 1911. Sarah (22) was single and had no occupation documented. Martin (17) worked as an agricultural labourer. Julia (12) recorded her occupation as a scholar. The entire family spoke both Irish and English. All the grandchildren could read and write but the adults could not read. The family lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. The house walls were made of permanent material while the house roof was made of perishable material. John Harte owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 fowl house.

John Tully (70) worked as a farmer. He was married to Honor (61). At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 35 years, had 9 children, 9 of whom were still alive in 1911.  They lived with their 4 single children. James (33) and John (23) listed their occupations as farmer’s sons. Mary (18) did not document an occupation. Margaret (16) was a scholar. Although John could not read, his wife and children were able to read and write. The family spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house walls were made of permanent material and the house roof was made of perishable material. John Tully owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 fowl house.

Michael Tully (77) worked as an agricultural labourer and a shepherd. He lived with his wife Mary (80). At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 52 years, had 5 children, 5 of whom were still alive in 1911. They lived with their 2 unmarried sons. John (51) and Michael (40) worked as agricultural labourers. Although no member of the household could read, they could speak Irish and English. The family lived in a 3rd class house with 1 front window and the house had 2 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material while the house walls were made of permanent material. Michael J Quinn owned the land on which the house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 fowl house.

Patrick Harte (68) worked as a farmer. He was married to Honor (61). Honor did not record an occupation. At the time of the 1911 census, Patrick and Honor were married for 40 years, had 11 children, 10 of whom were still alive in 1911. They lived with their 6 single children. Delia (30) had no occupation documented. Patrick (24) and William (20) listed their occupations as farmer’s sons. Honor (18) did not list an occupation. Winifred (15) and Michael (12) were scholars. The whole family could read and write. The 6 eldest members of the household spoke Irish and English. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house walls were made of permanent material and the house roof was made of perishable material. Patrick Harte owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

John Duignan (54) worked as a farmer. He lived with his wife Bridget (44). Although John could not read, Bridget was able to read and write. John and Bridget could speak Irish and English. At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 13 years, had 7 children, 7 of whom were still alive in 1911. James (12), Norah (9), Delia (8) and Thomas (6) were scholars. Patrick (4), Mary (2), and John (3 months) could not read. Their older siblings could read and write. James spoke Irish and English. Thomas Duignan, an unmarried man (48) who could not read was John’s brother. There was no occupation recorded for Thomas. Thomas spoke Irish and English. The family lived in 2nd class house with 3 front windows. 10 people occupied 3 rooms. John Duignan owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

Bridget O’Toole (82) was a widowed farmer. She lived with her widowed daughter-in-law Mary O’Toole (30) and 4 grandchildren John (9), Thomas (7), Maria (5) and Michael (4). Although Bridget and Michael could not read, the rest of the family could read and write. The 4 eldest members of the household spoke Irish and English. The 3 eldest grandchildren were scholars. The family lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house had walls made of permanent material and the house roof was made of perishable material. Bridget O’Toole owned the land on which her house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn and 1 cart house.

John Higgins (42) worked as a farmer. He lived with his wife Ellen (38). Ellen had no occupation recorded. At the time of the 1911 census, John and Ellen were married for 13 years, had 5 children, 5 of whom were still alive in 1911. Margaret (12), Sarah (10), Patrick (8) and Bridget (6) were scholars. James was 5 years old. John spoke Irish and English. There was no language listed for any other member of the family. Naturally James could not read at this early age but the rest of the family were able to read and write. The Higgins family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material while the house walls were made of permanent material. John Higgins owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house,  1 barn and 1 cart house.

James Conroy (83) who was a widower worked as agricultural labourer. He lived with his daughter Margaret Sweeney (55), son-in-law Martin Sweeney and his 2 grandchildren. Martin listed his occupation as an agricultural labourer and a general dealer. At the time of the 1911 census, Margaret and Martin were married for 16 years and they had 2 children. Mary Sweeney (14) and Patrick Sweeney (11) were scholars. Although the 3 adults could not read, the grandchildren were able to read and write. The entire family spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. The house walls were made of permanent material and it had a roof made of perishable material. John Higgins owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 piggery and 1 fowl house.

Michael Rattigan (39), his brother John Rattigan (35), his sister Catherine Rattigan (37) and his niece Sabina Rattigan (22) were recorded on the census form. They all worked as farmers. They could read and write. They also spoke Irish and English. All members of the household were single. The occupants lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 6 rooms. The house walls were made of permanent material while the house roof was made of perishable material. Michael Rattigan owned the land on which his house was situated along 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn and 1 cart house.

Patrick Quinn (93) who was a widower worked as a farmer. His unmarried brother William Quinn (76), nephew-in-law John Thornton (43) and niece Honor Thornton (36) were recorded on the census form. There was no occupation listed for William, John or Honor. At the time of the 1911 census, John and Honor were married for 5 years and they had 3 children: Mary (4), Patrick (3) and Michael (1). The only members of the household who could read and write were Patrick Quinn and Honor Thornton. The occupants lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. Patrick Quinn owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

John O’Toole (78) worked as a farmer. He lived with his wife Bridget (71) who had no occupation listed. At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 51 years and they had 9 children, 9 of whom were still alive in 1911. They lived with their 2 single children. Edward (43) listed his occupation as a farmer’s son. Ellen (33) did not document an occupation. The whole family could read and write. They also spoke Irish and English. They lived in 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 4 rooms. The house walls were made of permanent material and the house roof was made of perishable material. John O’Toole owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

Margaret Diskin (72) was a widowed farmer. She lived with her 2 single children. Martin (31) listed his occupation as a farmer’s son. Honor (28) had no occupation recorded. Although Margaret could not read, Martin and Honor were able to read and write. Margaret, Martin and Honor could speak Irish and English. The Diskin family lived in a 3rd class house with 1 front window and the house had 2 rooms. The house walls were made of permanent material and the house roof was made of perishable material. Margaret Diskin owned the land on which her house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

Patrick Connolly (68) worked as a shepherd. He lived with his wife Mary (63) who had no occupation recorded. At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 17 year but they did not have any children. Frank Connolly (50) and Thomas Connolly (48) who both worked as agricultural labourers were Patrick’s 2 unmarried brothers. Although none of the family could read, they spoke Irish and English. The family lived in 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house walls were made of permanent material and the house roof was made of perishable material. Patrick Connolly owned the house his house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 fowl house.

Thomas Tully (50) worked as a farmer. He lived with his wife Catherine (55) who did not document an occupation. At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 29 years, had 9 children, 9 of whom were still in 1911. They lived with their 5 single children. Patrick (26) and William (19) listed their occupations as farmer’s sons. Ellen (16) had no occupation recorded. Julia (13) and Thomas (11) were scholars. Although Thomas could not read, his wife and his children were able to read and write. The family spoke Irish and English. They lived in 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house walls were made of permanent material and the house roof was made of perishable material. Thomas Tully owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn and 1 cart house.

James Corless (55) worked as a farmer. He lived with his wife Margaret (52) who did not record an occupation. They both spoke Irish and English. At the time of the 1911 census, James and Margaret were married for 25 years, had 8 children, 8 of whom were still alive in 1911. They lived with their 7 single children. James (23) listed his occupation as a farmer’s son. Mary (20) had no occupation recorded. Margaret (15), Patrick (13), George (12), Rodger (9) and Cecelia (7) were scholars. The entire family could read and write. The only child that spoke Irish and English was Margaret. There was no language recorded for the rest of the children. The family lived in a 3rd class house with 1 front window and the house had 3 rooms. The house walls were made of permanent material and the house roof was made of perishable material. James Corless owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn and 1 cart house.

Michael Quinn (40) worked as a farmer. He lived with his wife Mary (21). At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 2 years and had 1 child Michael John (11 months).  John O’Reilly (17), an unmarried man worked as a farm servant. The 3 adults in the household spoke Irish and English. They also could read and write. Naturally Michael John could not read at this early stage. The occupants lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 6 rooms. The house walls were made of permanent material and the house roof was made of perishable material. Michael Quinn owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn and 1 cart house.

Mary McWalter (70) was a widowed farmer. She lived with her unmarried sons. Maurice (48) and Michael (40) listed their occupations as farmer’s sons. Bridget Harte (72) who was unmarried worked as a domestic servant. All occupants spoke Irish and English. Although Bridget could not read, the McWalter family were able to read and write. The occupants lived in a 1st building with 7 front windows and the house had 8 rooms. The house walls were made of stone, brick or concrete. The house roof was made of slate, tiles or iron. Mary McWalter owned the land on which her house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 boiling house, 1 barn and 1 cart house.

Martin Quinn (71) worked as a miller and a farmer. He lived with his wife Mary (67). At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 16 years, had 4 children, 4 of whom were still alive in 1911. Michael (15) listed his occupation as a farmer’s son. Mary (14), Francis (11) and William (10) were scholars. The whole family could read and write. They also spoke Irish and English. The house walls and house roof were made of permanent material. They lived in a 2nd class house with 5 front windows and the house had 4 rooms. Martin Quinn owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn, 1 cart house and 1 corn mill.

Michael J Quinn (69) worked as a farmer. He lived with his wife Catherine (50). At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 27 years but they had no children. Catherine had no occupation recorded. Michael Connelly (70) and Annie Grorke (20) were documented on the census form. Michael Connelly worked as a farm servant. Annie worked as a domestic servant. Although Michael could not read, the rest of the household were able to read and write. The occupants spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 1st class house with 6 front windows and the house had 7 rooms. The house walls and the house roof were made of permanent material. Martin J Quinn owned the land on which the house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn and 1 cart house.

John Quinn (58) worked as a farmer. He lived with his wife Mary (45) who did not document an occupation. At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 17 years, had 6 children, 6 of whom were still alive in 1911. John (15) listed his occupation as a farmer’s son. Michael (14), Patrick (12), Mary (10) and Thomas (8) were scholars. Bridget was 3 years old. Naturally Bridget could not read. The rest of the household were able to read and write. The 6 eldest members of the household spoke Irish and English. The family lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house walls were made of permanent material while the house roof was made of perishable material. John Quinn owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

Monuments

 

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This page was added on 23/02/2015.

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