Knockballyvishteal

Civil Parish of Dunmore

Pauline Connolly

Knockballyvishteal Townland Stone
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Knockballyvishteal

Cnoc Bhaile Mhisteil, hill of the town

Knockballyvishteal is situated in the civil parish of Dunmore, barony of Dunmore, County Galway. It is located in the north extremity of the parish, bounded on the north by the parish of Addergoole, west by Carrowbaun, Baunmore and the parish of Liskeevy and on the east by the parish of Addragoole and Gragahullian.

The Down survey map 1641 (pre Cromwell) shows that Knockballyvishteal was owned by a protestant Lord Birmingham. The Down survey map 1670 (post Cromwell) shows that the townland was owned by a catholic Lord Athenree. 144 acres of unprofitable land and 412 of profitable and forfeited land were specified.

O’Donovan’s field names books 1838 provides various spellings of this townland: Knockballyvishteal, Cnoc Baile Misteal, Knockavoillavishtail, Knockballywistell and Knockballymitchell. According to this source, Knockballyvishteal was the property of Earl Annesty, Castle Wellon, County Down. It contains 741 stature measure including about 202 acres of bog. There is a triangulation station situated in the central part of Knockballyvishteal.

Census 1841 – 1851Knockballyvishteal consisted of 741 acres 1 rood 28 perches. In 1841, there was a population of 281 people, 134 were male and 147 were female who inhabited 51 houses. In 1851, the population decreased to 130 people, 61 were male and 69 were female. There were 21 inhabited houses.

1851 Old Age Pension Census Forms

Honor Rhattigan – Application Number C15 1598: Honor Rhattigan applied for the pension on the 8th March 1915. At the time of the application, her address was Mr Michael Nestor, Shanballymore, Dunmore, Co Galway. According to Honor, her parents were Thomas and Mary Rhattigan (nee Deignan). Honor was paid an annual pension of £16-15-0.

Bridget Connolly – Application Number C16 1686: Bridget Connolly applied for the pension on the 29th February 1916. At the time of the application, her address was Mr William J Connolly, Knock, Milltown, Tuam, Co Galway. According to Bridget, her parents were Michael and Penelope (Nappy) Connelly (nee Corcoran). A list of children is provided on the 1851 Census Search Form: Mary (11), Thos (9) and Julia (7). Bridget was paid an annual pension of £16-15-0.

Griffith’s Valuation 1855

According to Griffith’s Valuation 1855, William R Maguire leased tenements to the following tenants: Malachy Hussian, Michael Connolly, Augustine Concannon, Edmund Rattigan, Michael Patterson, Bryan Patterson, William Clarke and William Burke. Rev Solomon Richards and Duke De Malford leased tenements to the following: John Connolly, Thomas Tracy and James Glynn.

Malachy Hussian paid an annual of rent of £32-10-0 for 91 acres 0 roods 33 perches of herd’s house, offices and land. Michael Connolly paid £66 for 142 acres 0 roods 19 perches of house, offices and land. Augustine Concannon paid £20 for 37 acres 3 roods 31 perches of house, office and land. Edmund Rattigan paid £7-10-0 for 14 acres 2 roods 10 perches of house, offices and land. Michael Patterson paid £9 for 15 acres 3 roods 11 perches of house, offices and land. Bryan Patterson paid £11-10-0 for 19 acres 1 rood 17 perches of house, offices and land. Patrick Burke paid £17-10-0 for 26 acres 3 roods 20 perches of house and land. William Clarke paid £26 for 49 acres 1 rood 38 perches of herd’s house, offices, house and land. William Burke paid £35-10-0 for 76 acres 1 rood 35 perches of herd’s house and land.

William Linskey paid £50 for 90 acres 1 rood 23 acres of herd’s house and land. John Connolly paid £28-15-0 for 62 acres 0 roods 39 acres of house, offices and land. Thomas Tracy paid £22 for 53 acres 0 roods 34 perches of house, offices and land. James Glynn paid £19-15-0 for 50 acres 2 roods 30 perches of house and land.

Census 1901

There were 21 households in Knockballyvishteal in 1901. The census forms were collected on the 1st April 1901 showed that there were 74 inhabitants. 40 were male and 34 were female. All occupants were Roman Catholics. They were all born in County Galway with the exception of one individual; Thomas McGargil (a farm servant) was born in County Mayo. Most of the women that were married to farmer’s listed their occupations as farmer’s wives. All houses were built as private dwellings. All house roofs were made of thatch, wood or other perishable material. The house walls were made of either stone, brick or concrete. Each head of household owned the land on which their house was situated. The heads of households were Mary Treacy, Honor Connolly, Patrick Patterson, Thomas Treacy, Patrick Walshe, Margaret Rattigan, Catherine Clarke, Patrick Lyons, Thomas Lyons, John Varrelly [sic], Bridget Flanagan, Lawrence Glynn, William Burke, Henry Burke William Burke, Michael Rattigan, Patrick Cussane, John Concannon, Patrick Rattigan, Luke Connor and William Connolly.

Mary Treacy was a married 64 year old farmer. There was no mention of her husband on the census form. She lived with her unmarried son John (18) who listed his occupation as a farmer’s son. They could both speak Irish and English. There was no information provided on whether they could read or write. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. Mary Treacy owned 1 piggery.

Honor Connolly was a 40 year old widow who worked as a farmer. She lived with her 2 unmarried children: Delia (14) and John (13). All 3 members of the family spoke Irish and English. Honor could not read while Delia and John were able to read and write. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. Honor Connolly owned 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Patrick Patterson (80) worked as a farmer. He was married to Mary who was 60 years old. They lived with their 4 unmarried children. John (35), Michael (33) and Patrick (18) listed their occupations as farmer’s sons while Honor (20) listed her occupation as a farmer’s daughter. The whole family spoke Irish and English. The head of family Patrick along with Honor and his son Patrick were able to read and write. Mary, John and Michael could not read. The Patterson family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. Patrick Patterson owned 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Thomas Treacy was an unmarried 30 year old man. He lived with his 28 year old brother John and his 60 year old widowed mother Mary. Although they could not read, they all spoke Irish and English. All 3 members of the Treacy family worked as farmers. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. Thomas Treacy owned 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 barn.

Patrick Walshe (65) worked as a farmer. He was married to Mary (85). Although they could not read, they could speak Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and his house had 2 rooms. Patrick owned 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

Margaret Rattigan (40) was a widow who worked as a farmer. She could not read. She lived her 16 year old son James and her 10 year old daughter Delia. Both son and daughter were scholars who could read and write. All of the family spoke Irish and English. The family lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. Margaret owned 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

Catherine Clarke was a 60 year old widow. She worked as a farmer. She lived with her 2 unmarried children. Catherine (28) recorded her occupation as a farmer’s daughter. Thomas (30) listed his occupation as a farmer’s son. The head of family could not read while her son and daughter could read and write. All 3 members of the Clarke family spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. Catherine owned 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 barn.

Patrick Lyons was an unmarried 42 year old farmer. He lived with his 60 year old widowed mother Mary. Although they could not read, they both spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. Patrick Lyons owned 1 piggery.

Thomas Lyons was unmarried at the age of 23. He worked as a herd. He lived with his unmarried sister Mary (24) and his widowed mother Margaret (60). Thomas and Margaret could not read while Mary could read and write. All of the family spoke Irish and English. There were no occupations listed for Mary or Margaret. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. Thomas owned 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

John Varrelly [sic] was a 45 year old farmer. He was married to Honor (40). They could both speak Irish and English. They lived with their 3 young sons: Thomas (5), William (3) and Patrick (1). Naturally the 3 sons could not read. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. John Varrelly owned 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 barn.

Bridget Flanagan was an 86 year old widow who lived on her own. There was no occupation listed for Bridget. Although she could not read, she spoke Irish and English. Bridget lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and her house had 2 rooms. Bridget owned 1 piggery.

Lawrence Glynn was a 58 year old widower. He worked as a farmer. He lived with his 28 year old unmarried daughter Margaret. Her occupation was listed as a farmer’s daughter. Although Lawrence could not read, Margaret could read and write. Lawrence and Margaret spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. Lawrence owned 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

William Burke (28) worked as farmer. He was married to Ellen (25). They lived with their 4 children: Patrick (4), Maggie (3), Stephen (2) and Peter (2 months). The head of household’s father also called William Burke (60) lived in the house. The 3 eldest members of the household spoke Irish and English. The only member of the Burke household that could read and write was Ellen. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 4 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. William owned 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 barn.

William Burke (55) was a farmer. He was married to Catherine (50). They could not read. They lived with their 3 unmarried daughters: Kate (21), Mary (19) and Honor (11). All 3 daughters could read and write. All of the Burke family also spoke Irish and English. The Burke family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 4 rooms. William owned 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 barn.

Henry Burke (65) worked as a farmer. He was a widower. Although he could not read, he spoke Irish and English. He lived with his 3 unmarried children: Mary (30), Bridget (28) and Henry (24). All 3 children were able to read and write. They also spoke Irish and English. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. Henry owned 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 barn.

Michael Rattigan (45) listed his occupation as a farmer. He was married to Mary (43). There was no occupation listed for Mary. Although they could not read, Michael spoke Irish and English while Mary spoke Irish only. Michael and Mary lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. Michael owned 2 farm buildings.

Patrick Cussane (82) worked as a farmer. He was married to Mary (76) who also worked as a farmer. They lived with their 4 unmarried children. John (38) and Michael (35) worked as labourers. Pat (28) worked as a carpinter (sic). There was no occupation listed for Nora (20). The entire household could speak Irish and English. The only 2 members of the family that could read and write were Pat and Nora. The rest of the family could not read. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. Patrick owned 3 farm buildings.

John Concannon (58) was a farmer. He was married to Bridget (50). Thomas McGargil (30) was listed as a farm servant. Although John and Thomas could not read, they both spoke Irish and English. Bridget could read and write. She also spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. John owned 2 farm buildings.

Patrick Rattigan (44) worked as a farmer. He was married to Mary (30). There was no occupation listed for her. They lived with their 2 young children: Michael (5) and Maggy [sic] (3). They were both scholars. Patrick and Mary were able to read and write. They also spoke Irish and English. Michael could read while Maggy could not read. Both children spoke English. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. Patrick owned 3 farm buildings.

Luke Connor (50) worked as a farmer. He was married to Marget [sic] (48). There was no occupation listed for her. They lived with their 4 unmarried children. Patt [sic] (28) and Luke (24) worked as labourers. Julia (22) had no occupation listed for her. Mary (18) was a scholar. The entire family were able to read and write. They also spoke Irish and English. The Conor family lived in a 2nd class house with 4 front windows and house had 3 rooms. Luke owned 4 farm buildings.

William Connolly (36) was an unmarried farmer. Martin Monaghan (18) was listed as a servant on the census form. Martin worked as a labourer. William and Martin were able to read and write. They both spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. William owned 2 farm buildings.

Census 1911

There were 21 households in Knockballyvishteal in 1911. There were 92 inhabitants, 49 were male and 42 were female. Each individual was a Roman Catholic. The census forms were collected on the 26th April 1911 showed that the houses were built as private dwellings during this time. Overall, there were 110 out-offices and farm buildings. There were 14 stables, 21 cow houses, 20 piggeries, 21 fowl houses, 19 barns, 2 workshops and 13 cart houses. The heads of households were: Luke Connor, Thomas Connolly, Patrick Rattigan, Michael Rattigan, Bridget Concannon, John Patterson, Mary Patterson, William Connolly, Margaret Rattigan, Patrick Lyons, Catherine Clarke, William Burke, Henry Burke, Margaret Lyons, William Burke, John Varley, Honor Connolly, Mary Tracey, Mary Tracey, Lawrence Glynn and Bridget Nicholson.

Luke Connor was a 71 year old widower who worked as a farmer. He lived with his 3 single children. Patrick (35) and Luke (28) listed their occupations as farmer’s sons. Mary (24) had no occupation listed for her. Patrick Crowe (55) worked as a farm servant. Patrick Crowe was the only member of the household that could not read. All occupants were able to speak Irish and English. All members of the household were born in County Galway. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material while the house walls were made of permanent material. Luke Connor owned the land on which the house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn and 1 cart house.

Thomas Connolly was a 70 year old widower who worked as a farmer. He lived with his single son John (36). John’s occupation was listed as a farmer’s son. Thomas was born in County Galway. John was born in England. They could both read and write. They also spoke Irish and English. Thomas and John lived in a 2nd class house with 5 front windows and the house had 4 rooms. The house roof and house walls were made of permanent material. Thomas Connolly owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 2 cow houses, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn and 1 cart house.

Patrick Rattigan (52) was a widower who worked as a farmer. He lived with his 2 single children. Michael (15) worked as a farmer. Bridget (14) was a scholar. Patrick’s brother Thomas Rattigan (45) also lived in the house. There was no occupation listed for him. All occupants were able to read and write. They also spoke Irish and English. All members of the Rattigan family were born in County Galway. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material while the house walls were made of permanent material. Patrick Rattigan owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

Michael Rattigan (69) worked as a farmer. He lived with his wife Mary (70). There was no occupation listed for her. At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 30 years. They had no children at this time. They were both born in County Galway. Michael and Mary lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material while the house walls were made of permanent material. Michael Rattigan owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

Bridget Concannon (65) was a widow who worked as a farmer. There were 4 individuals recorded on the census form. Her brother Patrick Healy (60) was a farmer. Jane Diskin, Bridget’s niece (12) was a scholar. Mary Concannon (50) was a visitor to the house. Thomas Mcgaragle (45) worked as a farm servant. All inhabitants were born in County Galway except for Thomas; he was born in County Mayo. All occupants were able to read and write except for Thomas; he could not read. The entire household were able to speak Irish and English. They lived in 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 4 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material while the house walls were made of permanent material. Bridget Concannon owned the land on which her house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn and 1 cart house.

John Patterson (42) worked as a carpenter, slater and farmer. He lived with his wife Julia Agnes (40). There was no occupation listed for her. They could both speak Irish and English. At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 13 years, had 7 children, 6 of whom were still alive at this time. Annie Maria (7) and Bridget Teresa (6) were scholars who could read and write. Michael Thomas (5), Julia Agnes (4), Norah (3) and Margaret Kate (3 months) were naturally unable to read at this stage of their lives. William Murray (41) worked as a farm servant. William was a widower who could read and write. He also spoke Irish and English. All of the Patterson family were born in County Galway while William Murray was born in County Mayo. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows. 9 people occupied 4 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material while the house walls were made of permanent material. John Patterson owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn, 1 workshop and 1 cart house.

Mary Patterson (74) was a widow who worked as a farmer. She lived with her 4 single children. John (45) and Michael (42) listed their occupations as farmer’s sons. Patrick (30) worked as a carpenter. Norah (32) had no occupation listed for her. Norah and Patrick were able to read and write. John and Michael could not read. Mary could read only. The entire Patterson family spoke Irish and English. All occupants were born in County Galway. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material while the house walls were made of permanent material. Mary Patterson owned the land on which her house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn, 1 workshop and 1 cart house.

William Connolly (48) worked as a farmer. He lived with his sister Bridget (68). Both brother and sister were single. They were born in County Galway. They were able to read and write. They also spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house roof and house walls were made of permanent material. William Connolly owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 fowl house.

Margaret Rattigan (50) was a widow who worked as a farmer. She lived with her 2 single children. James (28) listed his occupation a farmer’s son. Delia (24) had no occupation listed for her. All 3 members of the Rattigan family were born in County Galway. They could read and write. They also spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material while the house walls were made of permanent material. Margaret Rattigan owned the land on which her house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn and 1 cart house.

Patrick Lyons (68) worked as a farmer. He lived with his wife Mary (85). At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 42 years. They had no children at this time. Although neither of them could read, they both spoke Irish and English. Patrick and Mary lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 4 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material while the house walls were made of permanent material. Patrick Lyons owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

Catherine Clarke (78) was a widow who worked as a farmer. Although she could not read, she spoke Irish and English. She lived with her 2 single children. Thomas (43) recorded his occupations as a farmer’s son. Catherine (40) had no occupation listed for her. They were both able to read and write. They also spoke Irish and English. The Clarke family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material while the house walls were made of permanent material. Catherine Clarke owned the land on which her house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

William Burke (40) was a farmer. He lived with his wife Ellen (40). Ellen could read and write while William could read only. At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 16 years, had 8 children, 8 of whom were still alive in 1911. Patrick (15), Margaret (13), Stephen (12), Peter (10), Sabina (9) and Delia (6) were scholars who could read and write. Martin (4) and Thomas (2) were naturally not able to read. William‘s brother Patrick Burke (46) was recorded on the census form. He worked as a mason. Patrick was able to read and write. The 8 eldest members of the Burke family spoke Irish and English. The entire Burke family were born in County Galway. The Burke family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows. 11 people occupied 3 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material while the house walls were made of permanent material. William Burke owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn and 1 cart house.

Henry Burke (84) was a widower who worked as a farmer. He lived with his 3 single children. Mary (44) had no occupation listed for her. Bridget (42) worked as a dressmaker. Henry (34) who listed his occupation as a farmer’s son could read and write. The head of family Henry and his daughter Mary could not read. Bridget could read only. All of the Burke family spoke Irish and English. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material while the house walls were made of permanent material. Henry Burke owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

Margaret Lyons (73) was a widow who worked as a farmer. She lived with her single son Thomas (34). Thomas listed his occupation as a farmer’s son and shepherd. Although Margaret could not read, Thomas was able to read and write. They both spoke Irish and English. Both mother and son were born in County Galway. Margaret and Thomas lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material while the house walls were made of permanent material. Margaret Lyons owned the land on which her house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn and 1 cart house.

William Burke (68) worked as a farmer. He lived with his wife Catherine (60). There was no occupation listed for her. At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 33 years, had 4 children, 4 of whom were still alive in 1911. They lived with their 2 daughters. Catherine Lohan (29) had no occupation listed for her. Mary Burke’s (27) occupation was listed as a farmer’s daughter. Thomas Lohan (30) was listed as a son-in-law but he had no occupation documented for him. At this time, Thomas and Catherine were married for just under 1 year. They had no children at this time. All of the household were born in County Galway. William Burke could read only while the rest of the occupants were able to read and write. The entire household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material while the house walls were made of permanent material. William Burke owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

John Varley (55) was a farmer. He lived with his wife Norah (53). There was no occupation listed for her. At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 16 years, had 3 children, 3 of whom were still alive in 1911. Thomas (15), William (13) and Patrick (11) were scholars. The whole Varley family were able to read and write. They also spoke Irish and English. All of the family were born in County Galway. The Varley family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material while the house walls were made of permanent material. John Varley owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn and 1 cart house.

Honor Connolly (60) was a widow who worked as a farmer. She lived with her 2 single children. John (24) listed his occupation as a farmer’s son. Norah (21) had no occupation listed for her. All 3 members of the Connolly family were able to read and write. They also spoke Irish and English. Norah Canavan (2) was Honor’s granddaughter. Naturally, she could not read. All occupants were born in County Galway. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material while the house walls were made of permanent material. Honor Connolly owned the land on which her house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn and 1 cart house.

Mary Tracey (John) (75) was a widow. There was no occupation listed for her. She lived with her son John (31) and daughter-in-law Ellen (32). John worked as a farmer. There was no occupation listed for Ellen. Mary, John and Ellen spoke Irish and English. At the time of the 1911 census, John and Ellen were married for 5 years, had 4 children, 4 of whom were still alive in 1911: Mary (4), James (3), Delia (1) and John (1 month). Naturally, none of the grandchildren could not read at this stage of their lives. All of the family were born in County Galway. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows. The house walls were made of permanent material while the house roof was made of perishable material. 7 people occupied 3 rooms. John Tracey owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 2 piggeries, 1 fowl house, 1 barn and 1 cart house.

Mary Tracey (Tom) (88) was a widow. She lived with her 2 sons and her daughter-in-law. Thomas (60) and John (55) listed their occupations as farmer’s sons. Sabina Tracey (39) had no occupation listed for her. At the time of the 1911 census, Sabina and John was married for 9 years, had 4 children, 4 of whom were still alive in 1911. Thomas (7) and Stephen (5) were scholars. Michael was 4 years old. Mary Ellen was 4 months old. The 4 eldest members of the household spoke Irish and English. Everyone aged between 60 and 7 years old could read and write while the rest of the household could not read. All occupants were born in County Galway. The Tracey family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows. 8 people occupied 3 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material while the house walls were made of permanent material. Mary Tracey (Tom) owned the land on which her house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn and 1 cart house.

Lawrence Glynn (74) was a widower who worked as a farmer. He lived with his son-in-law John (39) who was also a widower and his granddaughter Mary (3). There was no occupation listed for John. Lawrence and John were able to read and write. They also spoke Irish and English. Naturally Mary could not read. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material while the house walls were made of permanent material. Lawrence Glynn owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn and 1 cart house.

Bridget Nicholson (80) lived on her own. She had no occupation listed for her. Although she could not read, she spoke Irish and English. She was born in County Galway. Bridget lived in a 3rd class house with 1 front window and her house had 2 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material while the house walls were made of permanent material. William Burke owned the land on which her house was situated along with 1 fowl house.

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This page was added on 28/10/2014.

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