Ardnagall

Civil Parish of Tuam

Pauline Connolly

Ardnagall Townland Stone
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Ardnagall

Ard na NGall, hill of the foreigners

Ardnagall is situated in the civil parish of Tuam, barony of Dunmore, County Galway. Ardnagall is located in the north west of the parish, bounded on the north by the parish of Dunmore and Liskeevy, on the south by the townland of Lisconly , Leanamore and Grange, on the west by the parish of Liskeevy, on the east by Grange and the parish of Dunmore.

The down survey map 1641 (pre Cromwell) did not provide any information, however the down survey map 1670 (post Cromwell) under the name ‘Ardahuma’ states that the owner was the Earl of Clanrickard, a protestant. 83 acres of both profitable and forfeited land are specified.

O’Donovan’s field names books 1838 shows that Ardnagall, which comprised of approximately 78 acres of bog and rough pasture, was owned by John Bodkin of Kilcloony House. There were 4 ancient forts in Ardnagall and a triangulation station which was situated in the central part of Ardnagall. This source recorded a number of different spellings for this townland: Ard Na NGall, Ardnagall and Aurdnagoul.

Census 1841 – 1851

Ardnagall consisted of 259 acres 1 rood 35 perches. In 1841, there were 26 residents, 15 were male and 11 were female who inhabited 4 houses. In 1851, there were 21 inhabitants, 10 were male and 11 were female. The Poor Law Valuation rate paid in 1851 was £89.

Griffith’s Valuation 1855

According to Griffith’s Valuation 1855, John Bodkin leased 253 acres 3 roods 30 perches to John Prendergast. John Prendergast paid a total annual valuation rate of £106 10s 0d for herd’s house, offices and land. Edward Kelly leased 1 acre 3 roods 6 perches to John Cruise. John Cruise paid a total annual valuation rate of £1 10s 0d for house, office and land. Edward Kelly leased 3 acres 2 roods 39 perches to Patrick O’Brien. Patrick O’Brien paid a total annual valuation rate of £3 10s 0d for house, office and land. The total annual valuation rate paid was £111-10-0.

Census 1901

The census forms that were collected on the 1st April 1901 showed that there were 3 households in Ardnagall. There were 17 inhabitants, 12 were male and 5 were female. All occupants were born in County Galway and were Roman Catholic. The heads of households were: Pat O’Brine [sic], Michael Treacy and Thomas Cruise. All houses were listed as private dwellings. The walls of all houses were made of permanent material. Each house roof was made of perishable material. There were a total of 10 out-offices and farm steadings in Ardnagall in 1901. The breakdown of this was as follows: 2 stables, 3 cow houses, 3 piggeries and 2 barns. 

Pat O’Brine [sic] was a widower. He was 80 years old and worked as a farmer. He lived with his son Thomas, his daughter-in-law Kate, grandson Peter and granddaughter Mary. Thomas listed his occupation as a farmer’s son. He was a 32 year old married man. Kate (Thomas’s wife) was 35 years old. Their two children were Peter (3) and Mary (1). The 3 eldest members of the household spoke Irish and English. No members of the household could read. The family lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and it had 2 rooms. Pat owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Michael Treacy was 61 years old. He worked as a shepherd. He lived with his wife Bridget who was 60 years old. Neither Michael nor Bridget could read. They lived with their 3 sons, 1 daughter-in-law and 3 grandsons. John was a married 31 year old man. He worked as a shepherd. James was unmarried at the age of 28 and worked as an agricultural labourer. Michael was a 25 year old unmarried man who also worked as an agricultural labourer. Honor, aged 27 was John’s wife. Their children were: Thomas (3), James (2) and Edward (1 month). The 6 eldest members of the household spoke Irish and English. Everyone aged between 31 and 27 could read and write. Naturally, the grandchildren were not able to read. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. Stephen McDonagh (of Dunmore) owned the land on which the house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

Thomas Cruise lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and his house had 2 rooms. Thomas owned the land on which his house is situated along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 barn. There is no Form A available online for Thomas Cruise, Form N shows that there were 3 inhabitants, 2 were male and 1 was female

Census 1911

There were 7 households in Ardnagall in 1911. There were 43 people, 28 were male and 15 were female. All occupants were Roman Catholic. All individuals were born in County Galway except for Mary Birmingham; she was born in County Mayo. The heads of households were: Thomas O’Brien, John Treacy, Thomas Cruice, John Murray, Michael Birmingham, Mary Connolly and Thomas Keaveny. All heads of households owned the land on which their house was situated. All houses were listed as private dwellings. There were 41 out-offices and farm steadings in Ardnagall in 1911. These included 7 stables, 3 coach houses, 7 cow houses, 4 dairies, 7 piggeries, 6 fowl houses, 6 barns and 1 shed. The census forms were collected on the 4th April 1911.

Thomas O’Brien was 40 years old. He worked as a farmer. He was married to Kate who was 53 years old. Thomas could not read while Kate could read. At the time of the 1911 census, they had been married for 15 years. They had 4 children, 4 of whom were still alive in 1911: Peter was 14 years old, Mary was 11 years old, Michael was 10 years old and Patrick was 5 years old. Peter, Michael and Mary were scholars who could speak Irish and English and were able to read and write. The youngest child could not read. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the family occupied 3 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material. The house walls were made of permanent material. Thomas owned 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

John Treacy, aged 42 worked as a farmer. He was married to Honor who was 29 years old. At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 3 years, had 2 children, 2 of whom were still alive in 1911. John lived with his 7 children: Thomas was 12 years old, James was 11 years old, Edward was 10 years old, John was 8 years old, Michael was 2 years old, Delia was 9 years old and Mary Ellen was 8 months old. The 5 eldest children were scholars. All of the children could read, write and could speak Irish and English except for the two youngest children; they could not read. Bridget Treacy, mother to head of family lived in the house. Bridget was a 75 year old widow. Although Bridget could not read, she spoke Irish and English. John Treacy lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and his house had 3 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material. The house walls were made of permanent material. John owned 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn and 1 shed.

Thomas Cruice [sic] was 56 years old. He worked as a farmer. He lived with his sister Catherine who was 54 years old. Thomas and Catherine were single. Although they could not read, they both spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material. The house walls were made of permanent material. Thomas owned 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

John Murray, a farmer was 65 years old. He was married to Margret [sic] who was 70 years old. At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 31 years, had 6 children, 5 of whom were still alive in 1911. John lived with his 3 unmarried sons who listed their occupations as farmer’s sons. Patrick was 29 years old, John was 25 years old and Michael was 23 years old. All of the household could read and write. They also spoke Irish and English except for 25 year old John; he could not read. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and his house had 4 rooms. The house roof and house walls were made of permanent material. John owned 1 stable, 1 coach house, 1 cow house, 1 dairy, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Michael Birmingham was 57 years old. He worked as a stone mason and farmer. At the time of the 1911 census, he was married to Mary for 27 years, had 6 children, 4 of whom were still alive and single in 1911: John M, a farmer’s son was 23 years old. Martin J was 22 years old. Mary Anne was 17 years old and Patrick was a 14 year old scholar. All of the Birmingham family could read and write. They all could speak Irish and English except for Patrick; he spoke English only. The Birmingham family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and his house had 4 rooms. The house roof and house walls were made of permanent material. Michael owned 1 stable, 1 coach house, 1 cow house, 1 dairy, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

Mary Connolly, a widow was 58 years old. She worked as a farmer. She lived with her 4 single children: Patrick C was 35 years old, Thomas was 23 years old, James was 16 years old and Bridget was 32 years old. The 3 sons listed their occupations as farmer’s sons. The entire Connolly family were able to read, write and spoke Irish and English. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the family occupied 4 rooms. The house roof and house walls were made of permanent material. Mary owned 1 stable, 1 coach house, 1 cow house, 1 dairy, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

Thomas Keaveny was 58 years old. He worked as a farmer. He lived with his wife Mary who was 52 years old. At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 24 years, had 10 children, 10 of whom were still alive in 1911. Thomas and Mary both spoke Irish and English. Mary could not read while Thomas could read and write. They lived with their 7 children. Katey [sic] was 18 years old who did not list any occupation. Pat was 16 years old. Tommy was 14 years old. Pat and Tommy worked as farm labourers. Michael was 12 years old. Mary was 10 years old, John was 8 years old and Oweny was 6 years old. All children aged 12 to 6 were scholars. All of the children could read and write except for the two youngest; John could read while Owney [sic] could not read. Thomas Keaveny lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and his house had 4 rooms. The house roof and house walls were made of permanent material. Thomas owned 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 dairy, 1 piggery and 1 fowl house.

 

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This page was added on 25/09/2014.

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