Cloonrane

Civil Parish of Addergoole

Pauline Connolly

Cloonrane Townland Stone
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Cloonrane

Cluain Rain, meadow or pasture

Cloonrane is situated in the civil parish of Addergoole, barony of Dunmore, County Galway. It is located in the north west extremity of the parish, bounded on the north and west by the parishes of Crossboyne (County Mayo) and Liskeevy, on the east by Cloondroon and on the south by Illaun.

The Down Survey Map shows that Martin Kirrowan, a catholic owned the land in 1670 (post Cromwell). 97 acres of unprofitable land and 206 acres of both profitable and forfeited land are specified.

O’Donovan’s Field Names Book 1838 provides various spellings of this townland: Cloonrane, Cluain Rain, Clun Rain, Clonrean, Cloonrain and Clooncrane. According to this source, Cloonrane was the property of Mr John Blake. It contains 467½ acres statute measure which includes 180 acre of bog.

Census 1841 – 1851

Cloonrane consisted of an area of 476 acres 2 roods 8 perches. In 1841, there was a total population of 197 people, 99 were male and 98 were female. They occupied 31 houses. In 1851, the population decreased to 137 people, 67 were male and 70 were female. They inhabited 25 houses. The poor law valuation rate paid in 1851 was £129-15.

Griffith’s Valuation 1855

According to Griffith’s Valuation 1855, John Blake was the main landowner at the time. John Blake retained an area of bog that comprised of 75 acres 0 roods 20 perches for himself which he paid £-15 for. He leased land to the following tenants: Mark Devan [sic], John Glynn, Thomas Nevin, James Connolly, Mary Mangan, Francis Denison, Mary Kilkenny, John Colleran, John Gibbons, Bernard Kilkenny, Edward Connolly, John Joyce, William Fitzgerald, Patrick Rush, Thomas Rahilly, Thomas Hopkins, Patrick Hopkins, James Hopkins, Anthony Langan, Patrick Mannion, Murtagh Gleen and John Loughlin. Mark Devan paid an annual rent of 4-15 for house and land. John Glynn paid £2-13 for house, offices and land. Thomas Nevin paid £4-15 for house and land. James Connolly paid £4-10 for house and land. Mary Mangan paid £4-10 for house and land. Francis Denison paid £4-15 for house, office and land. Mary Kilkenny paid £4-15 for house and land. John Colleran paid £4-10 for house and land. John Gibbons paid £4-15 for house, office and land. Bernard Kilkenny paid £4-5 for land. Edward Connolly paid £2-3 for land. John Joyce paid £14-15 for house and land. Patrick Rush paid £11-10 for 18 acres 2 roods 20 perches of house, office and land. Thomas Rahilly paid £15-5 for 28 acres 2 roods 6 perches of house, office and land. Thomas Hopkins paid £8-15 for 12 acres 2 roods 30 perches of house, office and land. Patrick Hopkins paid £10 for 15 acres of house, offices and land. James Hopkins paid £9 for 15 acres 1 rood 30 perches of house, office and land. Anthony Langan paid £13-15 for 32 acres 3 roods 3 perches of house, offices and land. Patrick Mannion paid £48-10 for 122 acres 2 roods 13 perches of herd’s house, offices and land. Murtagh Gilleen paid £1-10 for 2 acres 1 rood 30 perches of land. John Loughlin also paid £1-10 for 3 acres 0 roods 10 perches. John Joyce and Patrick Rush together leased 2 acres 1 rood 10 perches to William Fitzgerald which William paid £1-12 for house and land.

Census 1901

There were 16 households in Cloonrane in 1901. There were 10 residents, 43 were male and 57 were female. All occupants were Roman Catholics. The residents were born in County Galway except for 1 individual, Mary Hopkins was born in County Mayo. Every house roof was made of perishable material except for 1 unoccupied house. All house walls were made of permanent material. Thomas Mannion owned the land on which the unoccupied house (with a roof made of permanent material) was situated. The heads of households were: John Nevin, Michael Devane, John Mongan, Michael Donoghue, Patrick Dennison, Mary Kilkenny, Ellen Connolly, Martin Donoghue, Patrick Coyne, Ellen Hopkins, Mathew Walsh, Michael Hopkins, John Treacy, William Rush, Geoffrey Rush and James Hennelly.

John Nevin (60) worked as a farmer. He was married to Bridget (85) who did not have any occupation listed. They lived with their 3 unmarried children: John (24) who worked as a general labourer, Bridget (20) & Kate (14) who listed their occupations as farmer’s daughters. Although John and Bridget could not read, their children were able to read and write. The family spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. John Nevin owned the land on which his house was situated along 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Michael Devane (57) was a widower who worked as a farmer. He lived with his 2 sons: John (11) who recorded his occupation as a scholar and Michael (3). Naturally Michael could not read while his father and John were able to read and write. Michael and his son John spoke Irish and English. The Devane family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. Michael Devane owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

John Mongan (68) worked as a farmer. He lived with his wife Honor (65), his son Stephen (40), daughter-in-law Sarah (36), 2 granddaughters Nora (2) & Mary (1) and his 2 daughters Annie (21) and Mary (30). Honor recorded her occupation as a farmer’s wife. Sarah listed her occupation as a son’s wife. Stephen recorded his occupation as a farmer’s son. Annie and Mary listed their occupations as farmer’s daughters. Although Honor could not read or write, the rest of household were able to read and write. The Mongan family spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. John Mangan owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Michael Donoghue (66) worked as a farmer. He was married to Margaret (60) who did not have any occupation listed. They lived with their unmarried daughter Mary (40). The 3 occupants could read and write. They also spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. Michael Donoghue owned the land on which the land was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Patrick Dennison (60) recorded his occupation as a farmer. He was married to Mary (55). They lived with their 3 children: Thomas (18), Delia (15) and John (12). Thomas listed his occupation as a farmer’s son. Delia recorded her occupation as a farmer’s daughter. John listed his occupation as a scholar. Although Mary could not read, the rest of the household were able to read and write. The family spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. Patrick Dennison owned the land on which the house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Mary Kilkenny (50) was a widowed farmer. She lived with her 2 unmarried sons. Patrick (23) and William (19) recorded their occupations as farmer’s sons. Although Mary could not read, her 2 sons were able to read and write. The family spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. Mary Kilkenny owned the land on which her house was situated along with 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

Ellen Connolly (60) who was a widow worked as a farmer. She lived with her unmarried daughter Ellen (21) who recorded her occupation as a farmer’s daughter. Although Ellen could not read, her daughter was able to read and write. Both mother and daughter spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 1 room. Ellen Connolly owned the land on which her house was situated along with 1 piggery.

Martin Donoghue (55) worked as a farmer. He was married to Mary (58) who did not have any occupation recorded. Although Mary could not read, her husband was able to read and write. They both spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 1 front window and the house had 2 rooms. Martin Donoghue owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 piggery.

Patrick Coyne (49) worked as a farmer. He was married to Honor (42) who did not have any occupation recorded. They lived their 10 daughters. Mary (20) worked as a seamstress. Margaret (18) and Kate (16) recorded their occupations as farmer’s daughters. Norah (14), John (12), Patrick (10), Ellen (8), Annie (6) and Sarah (4) listed their occupations as scholars. Jessie was 1 year old and naturally could not read. Her sister Sarah could read while the rest of the household were able to read and write. The 9 eldest members of the house spoke Irish and English. The Coyne family lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows. 12 people occupied 3 rooms. Patrick Coyne owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Ellen Hopkins (64) was a widow who recorded her occupation as a farmer’s wife. She lived with her unmarried son Thomas (40) who listed his occupation as a farmer’s son and her single daughter Katie (27) who documented her occupation as a farmer’s daughter. Ellen could read while Thomas and Katie were able to read and write. They all spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. Ellen Hopkins owned the land on which her house was situated along with 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

Mathew Walsh (48) worked as a farmer. He was married to Mary (37) who did not document any occupation. They lived with their 9 children: Thomas (17) worked as a general labourer, Margaret (15), Mary (13), Malachy (12), Julia (10) & Kate (8) recorded their occupation as scholars, Ellen (6), Patrick (4) and Delia (1). Margrit [sic] Hopkins (70), mother-in-law of Mathew also lived in the house. She was a widowed woman who did not have any occupation listed and could not read. The 9 eldest members of the household spoke Irish and English. The family lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had just 3 rooms. Matthew Walsh owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 piggery.

Michael Hopkins (35) worked as a farmer. He was married to Mary (27) who did not have any occupation listed. They lived with their 2 young daughters: Margaret (4) and Mary (1) who naturally could not read. Although Michael could not read, his wife was able to read and write. Both Mary and her husband spoke Irish and English. The family lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. Michael Hopkins owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

John Treacy (30) worked as a farmer. He was married to Ellen (29) who recorded her occupation as a house keeper. They lived with their 7 children: Mary (8), Annie (7), Katie (5) & Norah (4) who were scholars, Patrick (3), Bridget (2) and Johnnie (2 months). Naturally the 3 youngest children could not read while the rest of the household were able to read and write. John and his wife spoke Irish and English. The family lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. John Treacy owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

William Rush (60) worked as a farmer. He was married to Bridget (47) who did not have any occupation documented. They lived with their 8 children. Patrick (24) recorded his occupation as a farmer’s son. Delia (18) and Julia (15) listed their occupations as farmer’s daughters. Norah (11), Winnie (9), Elizabeth (8) and William (7) listed their occupations as scholars. Thomas was 3 years old. Naturally Thomas could not read while his brother William could read and the rest of the household were able to read and write. The 6 eldest members of the household spoke Irish and English. The Rush family lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows. 10 people occupied 3 rooms. William Rush owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Geoffrey Rush (55) worked as a farmer. He was married to Honor (45) who did not have any occupation recorded. They lived with their 7 children. Patrick (17) recorded his occupation as a farmer’s son. Mary (15), James (13), Thomas (11), Edward (7) and Geoffrey (5) listed their occupations as scholars. William was 3 years old. Naturally William could not read. Geoffrey and his parents could read. The rest of the household were able to read and write. The 6 eldest members of the household spoke Irish and English. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows. 9 people occupied 3 rooms. Geoffrey Rush owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

James Hennelly (53) worked as a shepherd. He was married to Bridget (43) who did not have any occupation listed. They lived with their 8 children: John (17) who worked as a general labourer, Margaret (15) who did not have any occupation listed, Patrick (13), Kate (11), Julia (9) & James (8) who documented their occupations as scholars, Michael (4) and Thomas (1). The 7 eldest children were able to read and write. Their parents could not read. The 5 eldest members of the household spoke Irish and English. The family lived in a 3rd class house with 1 front window. 10 people occupied 2 rooms. Thomas Mannion owned the land on which his house is situated along with 1 farm building.

Census 1911

There were 15 households in Cloonrane in 1911. There were 93 residents, 43 were male and 50 were female. All occupants were Roman Catholics. Nearly all residents were born in County Galway. There were 5 individual who were born in County Mayo: Mary Hopkins, Bridget Rushe, 41 year old Mary Donohue, Sarah Mangan and Bridget Kilkenny. All house walls were made of stone, brick or concrete. The roof of each house was made of perishable material except for 1 house; the roof of the house which Patrick Kilkenny owned was made of permanent material. The heads of households were: James Hennelly, Michael Hopkins, Matthew Walsh, Ellen Hopkins, John Treacy, William Rushe, Honor Rushe, Patrick Coyne, Martin Donohue, Michael Donohue, Mary Donohue, Stephen Mangan, John Nevin, Michael Devane and Patrick Kilkenny.

James Hennelly (74) worked as a shepherd and farmer. He lived with his wife Bridget (57). At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 36 years, had 11 children, 10 of whom were still alive in 1911. They lived with their 4 single children: Julia (20) who had no occupation listed, James (18) & Michael (14) who recorded their occupations as farmer’s sons and Thomas (12) who listed his occupation as a scholar. Although James and Bridget could not read, the rest of the household were able to read and write. James and Bridget spoke Irish and English. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. James Hennelly owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

Michael Hopkins (48) worked as a farmer. He lived with his wife Mary (42). They could both speak Irish and English. At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 15 years, had 6 children, 6 of whom were still alive in 1911: Margaret (14), Mary Kate (11), Delia (9), Thomas (5), Michael (3) and Annie (7). The 3 eldest children recorded their occupations as scholars. The 3 youngest children could not read while the rest of the household were able to read and write. The Hopkins family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. Michael Hopkins owned the land on which his house is situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

Matthew Walsh (64) worked as a farmer. He lived with his wife Mary (54) who did not document any occupation. At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 30 years, had 11 children, 9 of whom were still alive in 1911. They lived with their 7 single children: Julia (21), Catherine (19) and Ellen (17) did not have any occupation listed. Patrick (15), Bridget (12), Matthew (10) and Teresa (7) recorded their occupations as scholars. All members of the Walsh family could read and write. They also spoke Irish and English. They lived in 2nd class house with 3 front windows. 9 people occupied 3 rooms. Matthew Walsh owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

Ellen Hopkins (74) was a widowed woman who lived with her unmarried son Thomas (52), her widowed daughter Mary Shaughnessy (48) and her granddaughter Catherine Shaughnessy (7). Ellen and Mary worked as farmers. Thomas listed his occupation as a farmer’s son. Catherine recorded her occupation as a scholar. Ellen could read only while the rest of the family were able to read and write. The 3 adults spoke Irish and English. There was no language listed for Catherine. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. Ellen Hopkins owned the land on which her house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 fowl house.

John Treacy (41) worked as a farmer. He lived with his wife Ellen (40). At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 19 years, had 12 children, 9 of whom were still alive in 1911. Mary (18) worked as a barmaid. Annie (17) worked as a dressmaker. Catherine (15) had no occupation listed. Norah (14), Patrick (13), John (8) & Bridget (6) recorded their occupations as scholars. Anthony (5) and Eveleen (4) naturally could not read while the rest of the household were able to read and write. Ellen, Mary, Annie, Catherine and Patrick spoke Irish and English. The Treacy family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows. 11 people occupied 4 rooms. John Treacy owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

William Rushe (71) listed his occupation as a farmer. He lived with his wife Bridget. At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 42 years, had 17 children, 12 of whom were still alive in 1911. They lived with their 3 single children. Minnie (21) did not have any occupation recorded. William (19) documented his occupation as a farmer’s son. Thomas (14) listed his occupation as a scholar. The Rushe family could read and write. They also spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. William Rushe owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

Honor Rushe (65) was a widowed farmer. She lived with her 5 children: Mary Kate (24) did not list any occupation, James (23), Thomas (21) & Edward (17) recorded their occupations as farmer’s sons. William (14) listed his occupation as a scholar. The family could read and write. They also spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. Honor Rushe owned the land on which her house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

Patrick Coyne (62) worked as a farmer. He lived with his wife Honor (58). At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 36 years, had 12 children, 12 of whom were still alive in 1911. They lived with their 7 children. Mary (35) recorded her occupation as a farmer’s daughter. John (23) listed his occupation as a farmer’s son. Elleen (19) and Annie (17) had no occupation recorded. Sarah (15), Teresa (12) and Sabina (9) documented their occupations as scholars. The Coyne family could read and write. The 4 eldest members of the household spoke Irish and English. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front window and the house had 4 rooms. Patrick Coyne owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

Martin Donohue (68) recorded his occupation as a farmer. He lived with his wife Mary (73). At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 15 years and had no children. Although Mary could not read, her husband was able to read and write. They both spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. Martin Donohue owned the land on which his house is situated along with 1 fowl house.

Michael Donohue (79) worked as a farmer. He lived with his wife Margaret (75) who had no occupation recorded. At the time of the 1911 census, Michael and Margaret were married for 53 years, had 9 children, 6 of whom were still alive in 1911.  They lived with their daughter Mary (51) who was a single woman who had no occupation listed. Also, recorded on the census form were their son James (45), daughter-in-law Mary (41) and 2 grandchildren Margaret (3) and Mary (2). James recorded his occupation as a farmer’s son. Naturally the grandchildren could not read at this stage while the rest of the household were able to read and write. The adults spoke Irish and English. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. Michael Donohue owned the land on which the house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

Mary Donohue (72) was a widowed farmer who could not read. She lived with her son John (22) who listed his occupation as a farmer’s son. He was a single man who could read, write and spoke Irish & English. Mary and John lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. Mary Donohue owned the land on which her house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

Stephen Mangan (50) listed his occupation as a tenant farmer. He lived with his wife Sarah (47) who did not have any occupation recorded. Sarah and Stephen spoke Irish and English. At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 13 years, had 6 children, 6 of whom were still alive in 1911: Norah (12), Mary (11), John (9), Thomas (7), Stephen (5) and Winfrid (3). The 4 eldest members of the household recorded their occupations as scholars. The 6 eldest members of the household could read and write. The Mangan family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. Stephen Mangan owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 fowl house.

John Nevin (78) was a widower who recorded his occupation as a farmer. He lived with his son Patrick (48), daughter-in-law Sabina (31) and grandson John (8 months). Patrick listed his occupation as a farmer’s son. At the time of the 1911 census, Patrick and Salina were married for 1 year and just had the 1 child. Naturally, John could not read while his parents were able to read and write. The 3 adults spoke Irish and English. The Nevin family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. John Nevin owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 fowl house.

Michael Devane (71) worked as a farmer. He lived with his wife Sarah (65) who had no occupation listed. At the time the 1911 census, they were married for 9 years. The census form states that they had no children. Michael’s 2 sons John (21) and Michael (13) lived with him. John listed his occupation as a farmer’s son while Michael recorded his occupation as a scholar. Although Sarah could not read, the rest of the household were able to read and write. All occupants spoke Irish and English. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. Michael Devane owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 fowl house.

Patrick Kilkenny (34) worked as a railway milesman and a farmer. He lived with his wife Bridget (36) who had no occupation listed. Patrick and Bridget spoke Irish and English. At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 8 years, had 5 children, 5 of whom were still alive in 1911: Mary Julia (7), James (5), John Patrick (3), Peter (2) and Margaret (10 months). Mary Julia and James recorded their occupations as scholars. Mary Julia and her parents were able to read and write. Thomas Sweeney (78) who worked as a farm servant was documented on the census form. Although he could not read, he spoke Irish and English. The occupants lived in a 2nd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 4 rooms. Patrick Kilkenny owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

 

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This page was added on 22/01/2015.

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