Ummeracly East

Civil Parish of Addergoole

Pauline Connolly

Ummeracly East Townland Stone
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Ummercly East, Co Galway

Iomaire Clai Thoir, ridge of a ditch

Ummeracly East is situated in the civil parish of Addergoole, barony of Dunmore, County Galway. It is located in the west end of the parish, bounded on the north by Pollaturick, on the east by Carton, on the west and south by the parish of Liskeevy.

Immerackley was the name provided on the Down Survey Map 1641 and 1670.

O’Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838 provides various spellings of this townland: Ummercly, Iomaire Claidhe, Imre Cladha, Umracloy and Ommeracly East. According to this source, Ummeracly East was the property of Michael Browne, Esq, Moyne. It contains 185½ acres statue measure including about 17 acres of bog. There is a triangulation station situated on the west end boundary of this townland.

Census 1841 – 1851

Ummeracly East consisted of 185 acres 2 roods 4 perches during this time. In 1841, there were a population of 63 people, 34 were male and 29 were female. There were 12 inhabited houses. The population increased in 1851 to 74 people, 37 were male and 37 were female who inhabited 15 houses. The Poor Law Valuation rate paid was £56-5-0.

1851 Old Age Pension Census Search Forms

Sarah Maloney – Application Number C17 6022: Sarah Maloney applied for the pension on the 1st August 1917. At the time of the application, her address was Mrs Sarah Devane, Killerneen, Milltown, Tuam. According to Sarah, her parents were James and Sarah Maloney. James (27) and Sally (20) are documented as being married in 1845. There is a list of children provided on the Census Form 1851: Kate (5), Sally (3) and Mary (4 months). Sarah Maloney was paid an annual pension of £16-14-0.

Thomas Dockery – Application Number C21 5: Thomas Dockery applied for the pension on the 1st January 1921. At the time of the application, his address was Emeracly, Milltown, Galway. According to Thomas, his parents were John and Mary Dockery (nee Hoban). Thomas Dockery was awarded an annual pension of £16-14-0.

Griffith’s Valuation 1855

According to Griffith’s Valuation 1855, Michael J Browne owned all of the townland consisting of 185 acres 2 roods 4 perches. He leased land to the following tenants: James Mullowney, Patrick Mullowney, James Fleming, Richard Fleming, James Devan, Patrick O’Neill, Michael Grehan, Patrick Connor, Mary Cullinan, John O’Neill and Thaddeus McDermott. James Mullowney paid an annual rent of £4-15-0 for 11 acres 1 rood 25 perches of house, offices and land. Patrick Mullowney paid £4-5-0 for 10 acres 2 roods 5 perches of house offices and land. James Fleming and Richard Fleming together paid £4-16-0 for 14 acres 1 rood 29 perches of house, office and land. James Devan paid £3-3-0 for 6 acres 2 roods 4 perches of land. Patrick O’Neill paid £8 for 20 acres 2 roods 32 perches of house and land. Michael Grehan paid £24 for 55 acres 1 rood 18 perches of house, offices, land and garden. Mary Cullinan paid £15-15 for 11 acres 0 roods 30 perches of house, land and garden. John O’Neill and Thaddeus McDermott paid £10-15-0 for 0 acres 1 rood 30 perches of house, office, land and garden. The tenants of Ummeracly East paid £0-9-0 for 13 acres 2 roods 10 perches of bog.

Census 1901

During this time there were 12 households in Ummeracly East. There were 48 inhabitants, 22 were male and 26 female. Most women that were married to farmers recorded their occupations as a farmer’s wife. All occupants were Roman Catholics. Most individuals were born in County Galway. The heads of households were: Honor O’Neil, Bernard O’Neil, Patrick Grehan, Patrick Grehan, Thomas Shaughnessy, Michael Feerick, Michael Burke, Bridget Connell, Richard Flemming, Mary Dockery, Wenfred Hannon and Sarah Mulloney. The census forms which were collected on the 25th April 1901 showed that every house was built as a private dwelling with walls made of stone, brick or concrete and the house roofs were made of perishable material.

Honor O’Neil (70) was a widowed farmer. She lived with her 2 unmarried children. John (28) listed his occupation as a farmer’s son while his sister Mary (26) listed her occupation as a farmer’s daughter. Although Honor could not read, her children were able to read and write. The O’Neill family spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. Honor O’Neill owned the land on which her house was situated. She did not own any farm buildings.

Bernard O’Neil (50) worked as a farmer. He was married to Mary (40). They lived with their 4 unmarried children. John (10) listed his occupation as a farmer’s son. Delia (6) was a scholar. Mary was 4 years old and Annie was 1 year old. Although Bernard and his 2 youngest children could not read, the rest of the family were able to read and write. The 3 eldest members of the family spoke Irish and English. The family lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. Bernard O’Neill owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 farm building.

Patrick Grehan (70) worked as a farmer. He was married Honor (72). They lived with their son Patrick (40), Ellen (30) and their 3 grandchildren: Mary (6), John (3) and Honor (6 months). Patrick listed his occupation as a farmer’s son, he was the only member of the family that could read and write. All members of Grehan family spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows. 7 people occupied 2 rooms. Patrick Grehan owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 farm building.

Patrick Grehan Senior (40) listed his occupation as a farmer. He was married to Margaret (42). They lived with their son Michael (2). No member of the Grehan family could read but they could all speak Irish and English. The family lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. Patrick Grehan owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 farm building.

Thomas Shaughnessy (70), a widower worked as a farmer. He lived with his 4 unmarried children. Patrick (30), John (32) and Thomas (29) listed their occupations as farmer’s sons. Bridget (40) listed her occupation as a farmer’s daughter. Although Thomas and his son Patrick could not read, the rest of the household were able to read and write. All occupants spoke Irish and English. The family lived in a 3rd class house with 1 front window and the house had 2 rooms. Thos Shaughnessy owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 farm building.

Michael Feerick (31) worked as a farmer. He was married to Mary (31). They lived with their 2 sons: Michael (2) and John (1). Naturally the 2 children could not write while their parents could read and write. The parents also spoke Irish and English. The Feerick family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. Michael Feerick owned the land on which his house was situated along with 2 farm buildings.

Michael Burke (50) was a farmer. He was married to Margret (40). They lived with their 3 sons and 3 daughters. Patrick (16) listed his occupation as a farmer’s son. John (7), Michael (6) and Honnour (12) were scholars. Mary was 2 years old and Bridget was 1 year old. Michael, Margret, John, Michael, Mary and Bridget could not read. Patrick could read while Honnour was able to read and write. The 3 eldest members of the household spoke Irish and English. Everyone aged between 7 years and 2 years old spoke English. The Burke family lived in a 3rd class house with 1 front window. 8 people occupied 2 rooms. Michael Burke owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 farm building.

Bridget Connell (45) was an unmarried woman who lived alone. No occupation was listed for Bridget. Although she could not read, she spoke Irish and English. She lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and there were 2 rooms in her house. Farrell McDonnell owned the land on which the house was situated along with 1 farm building.

Richard Flemming (32) worked as a farmer. He was married to Bridget (30). They both spoke Irish and English. They lived with their 2 children: James (4) and Mary (5) who were scholars. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. Richard Flemming owned the land on which the house was situated but he did not own any farm buildings.

Mary Dockery (60) was a widowed farmer. She lived with her 2 children. Annor (35) and John (23) were both unmarried. Although Mary could not read, her son and daughter were able to read and write. All 3 members of the Dockery family spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. Mary Dockery owned the land on which her house was situated along with 1 farm building.

Wenfred Hannon (55) was a widow who lived with her grandchild Wenferd Grehan (4). They could neither read but Wenfred Hannon spoke Irish and English while her granddaughter spoke English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. Thos Healy owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 farm building.

Sarah Mulloney (60) was a widow who worked as a housekeeper and spoke Irish. She lived with her unmarried daughter Maggie (30) who worked as a labourer. Maggie could speak English and Irish. Sarah could not read while Maggie could read only. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. Sarah Mulloney owned the land on which her house was situated along with 1 farm building.

Census 1911

There were 12 households in Ummercly East in 1911. There were 48 inhabitants, 22 were male and 26 were female. All occupants were Roman Catholics. County Galway was the birthplace of every individual except for 1 person; Bridget Flemming was born in County Mayo. The heads of households were: Richard Fleming, Mary Dockery, Michael Feerick, Margaret Mulloney, Honor O’Neill, Winifred Monaghan, Thomas Connor, Mary O’Neill, Patrick Grehan, Patrick Grehan, Patrick Shaughnessy and Michael Burke. The census forms which were collected on the 20th April 1911 showed that there were 10 houses were built as private dwellings. The remaining 2 buildings were listed as shops.

Richard Flemming (49) worked as a farmer. He lived with his wife Bridget who had no occupation listed for her. At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 18 years, had 5 children, 5 of whom were still alive in 1911. They lived with their 3 single children. Ellen (17) did not list any occupation. Mary (14) and James (12) were scholars. All of the family spoke Irish and English. Richard could not read while the rest of the household were able to read and write. The family lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material while the house walls were made from stone, brick or concrete. Richard Flemming owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

Mary Dockery (75) who was a widow worked as a shopkeeper and farmer. She lived with her daughter Norah (51) who had no occupation listed for her. Although they could not read, they spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class shop with 3 front windows and the building had 3 rooms. The shop roof was made of perishable material while the shop walls were made of stone, concrete or brick. Mary Dockery owned the land on which her shop was situated along with 1 stable and 1 piggery.

Michael Feerick (46) worked as a farmer. He lived with his wife Mary (45). At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 13 years, had 7 children, 7 of whom were still alive in 1911. They lived with their 6 children. Michael (12), John (11), Thady (10), Martin (9) and James (7) were scholars. Robert was 2 years old. Naturally Robert could not read while the rest of the household were able to read and write. The Feerick family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows. 8 people occupied 3 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material while the house walls were made of stone, concrete or brick. Michael Feerick owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 fowl house.

Margaret Mulloney (51) was a single woman who lived on her own and worked as a farmer. Although she could not read, she spoke Irish and English. She lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. The house wall was made of stone, concrete or brick while the house roof was made of perishable material. Margaret Mulloney owned the land on which her house was situated along with 1 fowl house.

Honor O’Neill (86) was a widowed farmer. She lived with her single daughter Mary Anne (32). Mary Anne did not list any occupation. Although Honor could not read, Mary Anne was able to read and write. They both spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house walls were made of stone, concrete or brick while the house roof was made of perishable material. Honor O’Neill owned the land on which her house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

Winifred Monaghan (70) who lived on her own and worked as a shopkeeper was a widow. Although she could not read, she spoke Irish and English. She lived in 3rd class shop where there were 2 rooms. The roof was made of perishable material while the walls were made of stone, concrete or brick. Michael Feerick owned the land on which the shop was situated along with 1 piggery.

Thomas Connor (50) worked as a farmer. He lived with his wife Winifred (46). At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 7 years and they had no children at this time. There was no occupation listed for Winifred. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material while the house walls were made of stone, brick or concrete.

Mary O’Neill (48) was a widowed farmer. She lived with her 2 children. John (21) was a single man who worked as a postman. Annie (11) was a scholar. The O’Neill family could read and write. They also spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. The house walls were made of stone, concrete or brick while the house roof was made of slate, iron or tiles. Mary O’Neill owned the land on which her house was situated along but she did not own any farm buildings.

Patrick Grehan (53) worked as a farmer. He lived with his wife Margaret (48). At the time of the 1911, they were married for 14 years, had 6 children, 6 of whom were still alive in 1911. They lived with their 5 children. Michael (12), John (11) and Mary Kate (10) were scholars. Margaret was 5 years old and Martin was 2 years old. Although Patrick and his 3 youngest children could not read, Margaret and the 2 eldest children were able to read and write. The 4 eldest members of the household spoke Irish and English. The family lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material while the house walls were made of stone, concrete or brick. Patrick Grehan (Junior) owned the land on which his house is situated along with 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

Patrick Grehan (63) worked as a farmer. He lived with his wife Ellen (49). At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 18 years, had 7 children, 5 of whom were still alive in 1911. They lived with their 5 children. Mary Ellen (16), Winifred (15), John (13), Norah (10) and Delia (8) were scholars. Patrick and his 4 eldest children could read and write. Ellen could not read. Delia could read only. The 6 eldest members of the household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material while the house walls were made of permanent material. Patrick Grehan (Senior) owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

Patrick Shaughnessy (47) worked as a farmer. He lived with his brother and sister. John (50) and Bridget (63) did not have any occupations listed for them. All 3 siblings spoke English and Irish. They were single. Patrick and John could read and write while their sister could not read. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and the house had 2 rooms. The house roof was made of perishable material while the house walls were made of stone, concrete or brick. Patrick Shaughnessy owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

Michael Burke (71) worked as a farmer. He lived with his wife Margaret (45). At the time of the 1911 census, they were married for 28 years, had 7 children, 6 of whom were still alive in 1911. They lived with their 5 single children. Annie (21) did not have any occupation listed for her. John (18) and Michael (16) listed their occupations as farmer’s sons. Mary (13) and Bridget (11) were scholars. Although the parents could not read, the children were able to read and write. All of the Burke family spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 1 front window and the house had 2 rooms. The house roof was made of slate, iron or tiles while the house walls were made of stone, brick or concrete. Michael Burke owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

 

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This page was added on 31/10/2014.

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