Carrowntomush Monuments

Sandra Noone

Carrownthomas Townland Stone
Milltown Heritage Group

Carrowntomush

There is a high cross, church, Bullaun stone and an earthwork in Carrowntomush

An earthwork is located on a hillcock in farmland. It is situated 100 metres north of the sinking river. It is marked on the 3rd edition of OS 6 inch map (1932) as a linear scarp. No visible surface trace survives. [1]

A high cross has been fixed to the outer west wall of the graveyard. Its original location may have been on the summit of a hillcock but this has been quarried away. The head of the granite cross is unfinished. The short arms appear to spring from small solid ring. Both arms are decorated with volutes. One face bears the outline of a figure in high relief with drooping outstretched arms and the head tilted slightly over the right shoulder ; evidently an unfinished figure of Christ.[2]

A church is located on a ridge in undulating grassland which is situated within the graveyard. It was marked on the OS 6 inch map as an ‘Abbey’. The church was described as an ancient church, only the west gable and small portions of side walls remain. Two windows; one at the west end of the south wall and one in the west gable still remain. The window on the west gable is 3 foot high. A loft may have existed on the west end of the building.[3]

A Bullaun stone is affixed to the graveyard wall.[4]


[1] GA016-014—-(Archaeological Survey of Ireland, Record Details). http://www.archaeology.ie compiled by Olive Alcock, Kathy de hÓra and Paul Gosling. Uploaded 05th August 2010 (18 Feb 2015)

[2] GA016-013008—-(Archaeological Survey of Ireland, Record Details). http://www.archaeology.ie compiled by Olive Alcock, Kathy de hÓra and Paul Gosling. Uploaded 05th August 2010 (18 Feb 2015)

[3] GA016-013001—-(Archaeological Survey of Ireland, Record Details). http://www.archaeology.ie compiled by Olive Alcock, Kathy de hÓra and Paul Gosling. Uploaded 05th August 2010 (18 Feb 2015)

[4] GA016-013007—-(Archaeological Survey of Ireland, Record Details). http://www.archaeology.ie compiled by Olive Alcock, Kathy de hÓra and Paul Gosling. Uploaded 05th August 2010 (18 Feb 2015)

This page was added on 19/02/2015.

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